Don’t Cry For Me America

Forgive me for stealing the title from the song written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice for the musical play Evita. A dear friend sent me a video this morning which I have seen many times before and decided to use as the basis for my post. There are so many parallels between the economic and political history of Argentina and the United States that this short video is a scary prediction of the direction and eventual outcome we face.

It is hard to understand why the country is divided almost an exact 50-50 between liberals and conservatives, but it is that way. What is harder to understand is that there is not a very large middle ground where some of the population can see, and argue both sides with compromise. For years we the people have been living with such a population, i.e. one that sees the value in compromise and is happy with the out come. Today, we face completely opposite mindsets. Both conservative and liberal are so set in their philosophy that they cannot even imagine not getting their way. I for one believe the only way to return the country to a manageable sanity is to totally destroy the other side. This would mean a civil war fought to the bitter end with one hundred and fifty million dead all on the same side. Since wars don’t turn out that way it would mean a hundred and fifty million liberals and a hundred million conservatives dead. The picture is not very pretty.

A civil war in the United States today would most likely mean that China would side up with the liberal side and take advantage of the situation. I’m not sure Russia would get into the fray, but they would sure enjoy watching the self-annihilation happen. All of this because one faction believes it is more correct than the other. I for one believe the correct side is the conservative one. To me communism stinks and has proven to be wrong many times over the years. Why the liberals continue to believe in this errant philosophy can only be attributed to mental illness. Of course the liberals see conservatives as being mentally unstable. So, may the best man win.

At this moment I see the liberals with an advantage as they control the military, the leadership power, and a very sympathetic press. It is a lot to overcome. Conservatives believe in the power of ideas, and liberals believe in the power of giving people what they want. The giving side works for a little while, but eventually dives into oblivion as the country goes bankrupt.

In the meantime, how do we fight this war? How can we defeat the evil without nuclear annihilation, and the help of a billion man army feeding themselves with chopsticks? Of course the liberals will say we must use diplomacy, but we know that doesn’t work too good unless one country carries a huge stick and holds it over the head of the other. World Wars One, and Two were fought because one country believed that by creating the perfect race it would lead to the perfect world. We know that didn’t work, but it cost both sides millions of lives to decide it. At the end of WWII a new philosophy entered the picture. The USA and England made a pact with the devil to help beat the Germans and that in turn led to Joe Stalin infiltrating Europe with his marvelous, wonderful political philosophy of communism. That really initiated a third war which we called the Cold War because there were no bullets or bombs involved. Even though the USSR disbanded and we thought our prayers were answered, the underground communists persisted and are beginning to win big. A large number of these communists invaded our schools of higher education and have been teaching our kids how wonderful it is to not have to work for a living and to get free stuff along with five weeks of vacation, and free child care, and free health care, and free food. Experts tell us to look at Norway and Sweden, they are living the high life under the socialist veil. What they don’t understand is that citizens in these countries are taxed, taxed, and taxed to the point of not being able to strip themselves of the yokes that bind them. They are not free to start their own enterprises, they have become slaves to the system. But, they like it! They lead relatively good lives and seem to be happy. Most likely they are happy because the government tells them repeatedly how happy they are. The North Korean fat boy tells his people repeatedly all day long over country-wide speakers how fortunate and happy they are to be starving. China does the same. Chinese seem to be very nationalistic, and happy to be serving dear leader. Just watch some Youtube videos of Chinese people being interviewed about their lives.

If the socialist system is so great then why do Hong Kong and Taiwan, both Chinese populations living in a capitalist world resist socialism so strongly? The answer is obvious, they like freedom and liberty more than the socialist yoke of sameness.

Is This the Future of America??

Put A Cork In It

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It finally happened, my cork container filled to overflowing. Can you guess how many corks are in this cagey little container?

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This clever wire formed barrel came to me as a gift a couple of Christmases past, and I have been busily engaged in selecting, and consuming the nectar of grapes fermented to perfection. It is no secret (in fact, nothing in my life is secret as one can tell by reading this blog) that I love red wine. It doesn’t matter what kind of red it is. Cabernet, Merlot, Syraz, Malbec, Pinot Moir, Chianti, you name it, I drink it. I listed them in order of my preference. So if you are looking for gift ideas, anything with one of those names on the label will be graciously received and consumed by me. If the color is not red then the game changes a bit. I also imbibe Riesling (Late Harvest) Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, and for the life of me I can’t remember the name of my favorite. It’ll come to me after my brain cells wake up and actually begin working for a living.

Although I enjoy a full-bodied rich Cabernet from Napa Valley the most, I don’t always afford that level of wine. Most of the time, I limit my purchase to a max of seven dollars, with the average per bottle cost coming in around six dollars. I am on a fixed income you know, and I must spend judiciously.

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The number of corks in the container doesn’t tell the entire story, because it does not count the times I drink with my friends at their homes, or in a restaurant. I don’t enjoy drinking in a restaurant as well because my sluggish brain goes into hyper drive when it registers a per glass price that exceeds my average per bottle price. I keep getting a little voice in my head that says “Go home and drink you dummy, it is cheaper.” It wouldn’t be so bad except the brain goes into a loop and I get the message over and over.

On some nights, the buzz is better than on others. I haven’t determined if it is because the choice had a high alcohol content or if the volume did it for me. One thing I do know is that any wine will make me high quickly on an empty stomach, so I always order my wine served with the meal.

I have a couple of friends who make their own wine and have been nice enough to share their product with me. I have to say that they are pretty good wine makers. One of them has grapes shipped to his home from California, the other buys grape juices. The one who crushes his own grapes produces the limit allowed by law. He is Italian and he shares with his entire family. The other, produces less than a hundred bottles a year for his own consumption.

I thought about making wine many years ago, but chickened out for fear of failure. My mother bottled grape juice that she made from Concord grapes grown in her garden. One year, a very loud bang awakened my dad from his evening nap in front of the TV. He jumped out of his chair and looked outside to see what happened. He saw nothing but his own breath. The night air was at zero, and there was not a soul on the street. He continued looking for the source of the noise, and discovered his basement turned purple. One of Mom’s juice bottles, which she stored on a shelf behind his bar, fermented and blew up. The idea of an explosion in my house caused me to stay away from becoming a vintner, but I am extremely happy with the arrangement I have devised for my self, and love sampling the wines of many vintners from around the world.

The cage has 192 corks in it. The estimated value of the wine represented by those corks is $1152. Not bad for an old guy on a pension. Corks are another subject. For many years wine was kept in the bottle by stuffing a cylinder of a squeaky-rubbery substance known as “cork.” Cork was readily available and makes an excellent seal. What I never knew is that cork is the outer bark of a cork oak tree. As the world grows in population and the wine consumption increases, and the number of cork oak trees remains the same, cork becomes scarce. Trees don’t like it when their protective covering gets stripped off. To solve the cork shortage problem, a group of people got together and drank some very good wine. After the buzz was on they dreamed up a plastic solution. Today, they make corks of a compressible plastic foam encased with a thin plastic sheath. It does just as good a job as cork, and is more available than cork. Lower cost wines will use plastic corks, while the higher end wines still use real cork for stoppers, and really cheap wines use twist off metal caps. The twist offs are very easy to open and I prefer them to the corky types. I have broken a half-dozen cork removers and still struggle with pulling the damn things out of the bottle. My wife says that is a good thing because it slows down my consumption.

The name of the white  wine that escaped my memory is Chardonnay. I had to look it up. Evidently, the brain cells associated with remembering white wines were lost after I finished my last glass of the stuff.

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A Three Pour Evening

A bottle of Argentina Malbec

A bottle of Argentina Malbec (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This day has been interesting. Yesterday, I discovered a cabinet on the wall of my garage falling down. The contents were too heavy for it and the fasteners began pulling out of the wall. Although, I didn’t want to tackle the job, I did. I removed the cabinet before it fell, and dragged it down to my basement workshop. There, I added new wood to reinforce the weak spots. Then I dragged the cabinet back upstairs and out to the garage. The plan was to remove the sister cabinet and to rework it before it too became a problem. A closer look at the sister cabinet changed my plan. It was very secure and already strengthened. I added more wood to it while it stayed in place. I also added a cleat under the cabinet to give it more foundation. There is no way I want to have to do this again. I finished the job, cleaned up the work site, put away my tools, and headed for supper, and some serious pain killing beverage.

The wine of choice this evening is Malbec from Argentina. I enjoyed a nice pour while heating my frozen pepper steak and rice dinner. Another pour with dinner, and a third with my dessert of pumpkin pie. By now my mind was somewhat numb, and I felt no pain. I donned my heavy jacket and left the house for a walk in the darkness, except it wasn’t dark. My neighbors have decorated their yards with hundreds of mini-lights on their trees, shrubs, gutters, and houses. It was not dark, it was beautiful.

I didn’t walk fast tonight, I kind of stumbled along. The sidewalks were somewhat uneven and I stumbled from side to side in a jerky rapid fashion. Kind of like I was trying to keep myself from falling down. I needed to make a sudden fast moves to stay upright.

The streets of my neighborhood seemed magical. A few years ago, the President of the local Homeowners Association talked everyone into decorating their parkway trees with the same colors, green lights on the tree trunks and white lights on the branches. The sight of a long curvy street lined with trees glowing in green and white lights is absolutely beautiful. The tradition continues and only those houses that are empty or those that are newly occupied do not follow the formula. They are obvious since they are dark and break the chain of diamonds glistening in the night air.

A full moon accompanied by cold crisp air added to the beauty of the evening by contributing a special aura to the electrical lights. By the end the walk my steps were less tenuous and my side to side wandering narrowed to a smooth slightly wavy line.

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