PSA-210413-Carbon Dioxide

 

Ian Rutherford Plimer   is an Australian geologist, professor emeritus of earth sciences at the University of Melbourne, professor of mining geology at the University of Adelaide, and the director of multiple mineral exploration and mining companies.

 He has published 130 scientific papers, six books and edited the Encyclopedia of Geology.  Sounds pretty learned/credible, don’t you think?

These are his extensive credentials:

Born12  February 1946
ResidenceAustralia
NationalityAustralian
FieldsEarth Science, Geology,Mining Engineering
InstitutionsUniversity of New England,University of Newcastle,University of Melbourne,University of Adelaide
Alma materUniversity of New South Wales,Macquarie University
ThesisThe pipe deposits of tungsten-molybdenum-bismuth in easternAustralia (1976)
Notable awardsEureka Prize (1995, 2002),Centenary Medal(2003),Clarke Medal (2004)

Where Does the Carbon Dioxide Really Come From?

Professor Ian Plimer’s book in a brief summary:

PLIMER : “Okay, here’s the bombshell. The volcanic eruption in Iceland.  Since its first spewing of volcanic ash, it has, in just FOUR DAYS, NEGATED EVERY SINGLE EFFORT you have made in the past five years to control CO2 emissions on our planet – all of you.

Of course, you know about this evil carbon dioxide that we are trying to suppress – it’s that vital chemical compound that every plant requires to live and grow and to synthesize into oxygen for us humans and all animal life.

I know….it’s very disheartening to realize that all of the carbon emission savings you have accomplished while suffering the inconvenience and expense of driving Prius hybrids, buying fabric grocery bags, sitting up till midnight to finish your kids “The Green Revolution” science project, throwing out all of your non-green cleaning supplies, using only two squares of toilet paper, putting a brick in your toilet tank reservoir, selling your SUV and speedboat, vacationing at home instead of abroad,nearly getting hit every day on your bicycle, replacing all of your 50 cent light bulbs with $10.00 light bulbs…..well, all of those things you have done have all gone down the tubes in just four days!

The volcanic ash emitted into the Earth’s atmosphere in just four days – yes, FOUR DAYS – by that volcano in Iceland has totally erased every single effort you have made to reduce the evil beast, carbon. And there are around 200 active volcanoes on the planet spewing out this crud at any one time – EVERY DAY.

I don’t really want to rain on your parade too much,

but I should mention that when the volcano Mt Pinatubo erupted in the Philippines in 1991, it spewed out more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than the entire human race had emitted in all its years on earth.

Yes, folks, Mt Pinatubo was active for over One year – think about it.

Of course, I shouldn’t spoil this ‘touchy-feely tree-hugging’ moment and mention the effect of natural solar and cosmic activity, and the well-recognized 800-year global heating and cooling cycle, which keeps happening despite our completely insignificant efforts to affect climate change.

And I do wish I had a silver lining to this volcanic ash cloud, but the fact of the matter is that the wildfire season across the western USA and Australia this year alone will negate your efforts to reduce carbon in our world for the next two to three years. And it happens every year.

Just remember that your government just tried to impose a whopping carbon tax on you, on the basis of the BOGUS ‘human-caused’ climate-change scenario.

Hey, isn’t it interesting how they don’t mention ‘Global Warming’ anymore, but just ‘Climate Change.

It’s because the planet has COOLED by 0.7 degrees in the past century and these global warming advocates got caught with their pants down.

And, just keep in mind that you might yet have an Emissions Trading Scheme – that whopping new tax – imposed on you by your government, that will achieve absolutely nothing except make you poorer.

It won’t stop any volcanoes from erupting, that’s for sure.

But, hey, …..go give the world a hug and have a nice day

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Here is a link to a debate which argues every point made in Dr. Palmer’s dissertation:

I argue against the fact checking article this way: The debater claims that for every dollar spent on reducing air pollution there is thirty times return. This is probably true, but I must posit that there is also a law of diminishing returns that the debater has conveniently left out. I have lived through the years of great air quality improvements in our country. and the improvement has been great. What I see now is that a great expense has to be incurred for less and less improvement. The debater should concentrate on cleaning the air in countries that are major polluters. It is my opinion that he will not because he hasn’t the fortitude to do so. He is also one who believes the USA has deep pockets and thus should be the one who bears the burden of the global clean up .

The United States undertook its massive clean up at the expense of our economy, I trust that the countries that are now passing through that stage will soon realize that they cannot continue to spew toxins into the air to poison their citizens. The problem with my argument is that countries like China who suffer from massive poverty see air pollution as a minimal problem. Why spend trillions to clean the air to extend the lives of the Chinese only to have them starve to death. Their priorities are correct: 1. eliminate poverty and hunger, 2. Eliminate air pollution.

Meanwhile, the pollsters spill the toxins into the atmosphere and dilute them into the cleaner sectors thus harming inhabitants far from the perpetrators. So is it our responsibility to clean up the global atmosphere by filtering the the pollutants in our local atmosphere that are arriving from the opposite half of the earth? I say not. It makes more sense to do it locally where the effect will be much greater and the country can benefit for the investment by thirty times.

I Made It!

Throughout my lifetime I always made crude comments about people who park diagonally across the designated lines marking a parking spot. “Crazy old people” was one of my favorites. Parking diagonally takes up as many as three spaces and in a crowded parking lot that is a problem for those of us cruising the aisle s seeking a place to settle. Many years have passed and I taught myself to park between the lines as symmetrically as I possibly could. I pride myself on being able to do that. Parking with precision is my motto.

Last week I didn’t pre-plan my approach to a spot and pulled in as well as was possible for a long car. When I got out and looked at the position of the line relative to the car I laughed out loud and said, “Crazy Old Man.” I did it without trying very hard and parked diagonally in the spot. I achieved senior parking status without trying.

My plan is to buy a new car soon, as my trusty Avalon which I fondly refer to as the Death Star is beginning to show signs of age and the mileage is quickly approaching two hundred thousand. The problem I see for me is that the new car I want is longer and will be harder to park. So the title of “Crazy Old Person” will be forever bestowed upon me, by me.

Conclusions Over Time

During my lifetime I have worked in many companies and at many jobs. Often, I see a job that strikes my fancy, and then ask myself if that is what I would be able to do, or better yet what I would want to do.

A lifetime for some people is a long time, for others it is way too short, but a working lifetime can be an eternity of drudgery or the opposite an eternity of bliss regardless of how many years are spent doing it.

I’ve wanted to do this for a long time so today is the day I list some of the jobs that I will never do:

  1. Drive a truck long distances. I’ve driven across our country at least a dozen times and I know how long it takes and how boring it can be. In the beginning I thought that being a truck driver would be a nobel profession that I could enjoy. But, as the miles added up I changed my mind. There is no way that I could survive driving a semi-tractor hauling a trailer across the country day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year to make a living.
  2. Operate a molding machine. I worked in a place where we made things from plastic. I spent my career designing ways to eliminate the person from the process. The main reason was that the company didn’t want to pay the price of employing people to open and close a molding machine door to remove the plastic part. Yet we had many young men who thrived on doing just that. I would lose my mind if that is what I had to do to keep my family alive and well.
  3. Make art for a living. I love art, I love creating artistic pieces, but the pressure of doing it for a living just doesn’t appeal to me. Making one of something can be exciting, but making a hundred of the same thing turns me off. My creativity flourishes the best when I don’t have the pressure of trying to make a living doing it.
  4. Acting is another profession that appeals to me until I begin to analyze what life would be like doing it. It is one thing to act in a play for a few performances then get on with another, but the idea of being in a hit play that runs for months or years can be monotonous. I don’t think I could maintain a character different than myself for too long. Yet, the best actors and actresses can become someone else and play their roles day after day with a degree of professionalism that is commendable. To me it is like Ground Hog Day and after a week I’d rather listen to finger nails scratching across a black board.
  5. Policeman. A no brainer for me, The idea of trying to control the behavior of other people by writing tickets or mediating domestic problems or getting shot at by a bad guy is not appealing.
  6. Doctor of Medicine. Although I love science and learning about things I don’t like the idea of spending twelve years of intense study and practice to get there. I had actually considered becoming a doctor when I was fifteen, but decided against it when I thought about the hours involved and the intensity of the learning required.
  7. Priest. No way! I love God, but the prospect of becoming a celibate priest does not work at all. I spent a lot of my boyhood years on my knees as an altar boy and hated learning Latin prayers and responses. Most theology, and philosophy courses that I took just scrambled my brain and dumped me off.
  8. Flea market vendor. I like going to flea markets and the idea of making money by reselling stuff appealed to me. I did experience a few garage sales and enjoyed the activity of negotiating and selling, but mostly I enjoyed the kibitzing I did with the people who dropped by. Selling junk is okay, but accumulating and storing junk turns me off. The reason I loved my garage sale was because I was clearing my house from a lot of unnecessary stuff that just cluttered my mind and my real passions.
  9. Accountant-Keeping track of my debits and credits is the last thing on my list of enjoyable activities. Every year I struggle with completing a tax return. The wierd thing about it is understanding all the vocabulary that accountants use in their work. Reading an Internal Revenue Tax return is like reading an ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic tablet. Not my language at all.
  10. Write User manuals for a piece of technical junk like a computer or a printer. This is another world where the people who live in it use a special form of communication which only they understand. What is scary is that so many young people can actually make sense of it. Although I have learned that young people don’t really read manuals, they use repetitive activity to solve problems by trying and failing many things. Me, I try things too, but I stop doing it after failing a couple of times. My patience level for learning all the cute and tricky features on an Apple iPhone is about as long as the time it takes a balloon to deflate after a pin prick. They have also mastered the strange language of phone technology.
  11. Statistics-I understand the importance of using statistics to make sense out of data that on the face appears a jumble, but I can’t stand the mathematics needed to unjumble the data.
  12. Furniture making requires an intense focus on details and a knowledge of wood cutting equipment. I have just enough skill in this field to believe I could succeed, but in reality I don’t have the patience required.

I can go on and on listing the things that I can’t or won’t make a living doing, but making this list is beginning to bore me.

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